Wednesday, 13 May 2015

Killer Opening Songs (Oyá by Ibeyi)

Wrapped in aromatic minimalist sounds, suffused with palate-enhancing jazzy beats and carried on a platter of ground-breaking electronic melodies, Ibeyi, Cuban twin sisters Lisa Kaindé Díaz and Naomi Díaz’s debut album, is a musical feast.

It is only fair to talk about Ibeyi in culinary terms since it is such a succulent offering. At the centre of it, as usual, is the Killer Opening Song, Oyá. This track is a perfect introduction to the risk-taking approach to music the twins show throughout the entire record.

First of all, they dare to pare down a song dedicated to the most impetuous and violent of the orishas to the basics. For those of you who are not in the know, K.O.S is happy to inform you that Oya’s chants and dances are characterised by a non-stopping, high tempo and frantic rhythm. Oyá is the orisha who challenges the ever-philandering Changó (only to fall for his charms after). She is said to “own” the wind, storms, hurricanes and shooting stars. In this Killer Opening Song all that energy is kept to a minimum. Using this baseline as a starting point the twins then proceed to add layers and layers of vocal power. That such a short piece is so full of magical moments is a testament to the good production and musical arrangement, not only on Oyá, but also in the rest of the album.

K.O.S mentioned magic and two examples jump out: the batá drums break, more than a couple of minutes into the song, and the video. Starting with the latter and going back to Lisa and Naomi’s daring approach, it was a brave move to shoot the video in black and white. If something characterises Oyá is colour. Google up any performance to this orisha and you will see women in multi-coloured dresses. But by resorting to monochromatic tones the twins (Ibeyi translates as "twins" from Yoruba) highlight the other trait Oyá posseses: she “owns” the cemetery and is said to live at its gate. Hence the ghost-like, spectral feel of song and clip and the translucent images of both sisters (their lips do not even move, thus, rendering their appearance poltergeist-like). The break from vocals to batá drums is a masterstroke. It is not just the change in rhythm but also in language. Up until then the lyrics were in English, now it is the time for Yoruba, that ancient lexicon brought to Cuba by hundreds of thousands of slaves.

As a Killer Opening Song, Oyá is the key that unlocks a trove of musical treasures, each unique in their own way. Oshún-themed River has a gospel feel, Mama Saysearly lyricism contrasts beautifully with the Elegguá-inspired ending and Ghosts is full of the same eerie, other-worldly energy that permeates the album, this time with an exquisite tribute to the Giant of Ocha, Agayú.

For those who like their music the same way they like their food, made with love, Ibeyi is the perfect record. Especially for those long summer nights ahead. And once again, it is all down to the magic of the Killer Opening Son.




© 2015

Next Post: “Saturday Evenings: Stay In, Sit Up and Switch On”, to be published on Saturday 16th May at 6pm (GMT)

17 comments:

  1. Not sure if I ever mentioned this, but just in case I didn't, I find your header stunning! It looks so inviting with the beautiful sky, clouds and water! :)

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    1. Thanks, especially because I consider as less than an amateur photographer. It took me quite a while to convince myself to use that photograph for my header. I like it, though.

      Greetings from London.

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  2. Haunting music and video. I haven't seen/heard anything quite like it. Black and white suits the music very well.

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  3. Definitely haunting. Thank you so much for the introduction.

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  4. Quite the eerie video and the song really goes along with it indeed

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  5. I adore minimal ambient and will check them out NOW!


    ( '>
    /))
    //""

    ALOHA from Honolulu,
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^=

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  6. Black and white does seem to go best with the mood of the music and the landscape of the video, but I am not so sure it matches the allusions to food: "Aromatic" and "palate-enhancing." As for the music itself, I would term it tasty whether in color or in black and white.

    I like the sound of your twins, CiL, and will listen to more of their songs.

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  7. My goodness, this is incredible music. It is so haunting and powerful. And the video really does the music justice. Black and white is so expressive, so full of moods and possibilities. Thank you for sharing this.

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  8. Thank you for this recommendation Cubano. You might like this article about a little boy Jazz pianist: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/13/arts/music/joey-alexander-an-11-year-old-jazz-sensation-who-hardly-clears-the-pianos-sightlines.html?src=me

    Take care and thanks always for your cool outlook and kind support. k. (Manicddaily)

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  9. oh what a shame - i cannot watch the vid due to GEMA reasons...ugh.... sounds just so good - would've loved to check it out

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  10. *sighs* - this is wonderful. Thank you.

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  11. I like her voice, it is what I call 'pure'. Enjoyed listening to this.

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  12. ¡Muchacho! Un mes entero escuchándolas sin parar. Sólo puedo compararlo con una adicción. Cada vez que escucho el disco descubro nuevos matices en cada canción. La primera vez que lo escuché de un tirón pensé en cantos gregorianos, en música sagrada y triste. Sabiendo el origen de las canciones, como las dedicadas a la hermana y padre fallecidos y las religiosas, forman un disco indescriptible y, en mi opinión, irrepetible. Las a-do-ro.

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  13. Thanks for your comments. Please, click on the links to the other songs. They are just as good. Great album and hopefully a brilliant future ahead for the twins! :-) I must also add that they are the daughters of the great late Cuban percussionist Angá. I did not want to include that detail in my review because the "sisters are doing it for themselves" in their own right without any help from daddy. But, it's worth mentioning that they come from a strong musical background.

    Greetings from London.

    Greetings from London.

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